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TRAWLING LIFE INDEX
 

ALL AT TEA

From the end of WWII each vessel would receive a bill for the stores placed aboard seperate from the expenses of the vessels voyage below we can see the brakdown of such a bill for the PICT in 1947

£
S
D
BOND 18 19 5
BUTCHER 19 9 11
GROCER 36 8 7
GREENGROCER 4 11 -
DRINKING WATER - 15 9
SUNDRIES 4 10
Total Divided into 25 shares 94 12 2
Share Per Man 2 19 8

In these days the Tea was in big sacks and where of large leaves, the cook who started at 5am would put the large kettle on the stove and brew up, this would not be done again untill late Tea if you wanted a mug of Tea you had to buy the tea from bond. This was also the case for the following items Soap , Tea , Sugar , Milk , Dundee Cake.

" I sailed on one ship and we where running short of beans, as we had entered port and another Hull Trawler was tied up along side, he asked if we had any spare tea, of which we arraged a swap Tea for Beans, as we carried the bags of tea to the other trawler the old man caught us, he told me I would be reported for selling the ships stores and would be sacked on return, we never did get the beans, as cook one of my other jobs was to clean the old mans cabin as we went down the river, the deckie came down and said the old man is waiting for you to clean his gaff, I told the deckie to tell him to F off as I was sacked". by CV - Skipper CD.

BOTTLE OF HESSLE ROAD.

This was a mixture of vinegar and powdered mustard mixed and placed in a bottle and found on almost every trawler, and was called Hessle Road.

 

( HAS SHE BOILED GEORGE )

" George the cook was known to wake up with a cobb on every morning, as he had just placed the usual 5am tea kettle on the stove a deckie walks in the galley and shouts, has she boiled George. George then got the sack of tea, and every pan and receptacle that would hold water and boiled the lot",

GALLEY BOYS : Galley Boys where not paid a share of the trip money and relied upon the tips of the crew, Kingstons had a policy whereby the galley boy received a full share of the liver money, several vessels would also have the policy where the Galley Boys bond bill was also payed by the crew, on settling day the galley boy would go to the office and receive any tips from the crew, if he had worked well he would be treat, if not he would get little, although there where some crew that deliberately waited till late afternoon to settle hoping the galley boy had given up.

"The food supplied to the ships was the bare minimum, for example, there would be only enough bacon for two breakfasts throughout the trip. And there were no such luxuries as eggs. Your diet was supplemented by having fish for breakfast, dinner, and tea . The potatoes that came on board were sometimes dyed purple which meant they were only suitable for animals (pigs)". Walt Lewis

By the early 60`s the system changed and a typically prescribed stores list was brought in the trawler owners arranged for it to be placed aboard the vessel and the cost was deducted from the skipper and mates settlings.

This list is a typical prescribed minimum a Sidewinder trawler should take to sea for 20 men for a 21 day period in the 1960`s
TEA 10Kg SAGO 4Kg
SUGAR 65Kg CUSTARD POWDER 4Kg
MILK 156 Evaporated SEMOLINA 4Kg
MILK 24 Condensed CORNFLOUR 3Kg
COFFEE 2 Tins Lg YEAST 4Kg =1Tin
TINNED FRUIT 12 DRIED CURRANTS 3Kg
TINNED PEAS 18 DRIED SULTANAS 3Kg
TINNED BEANS 18 DRIED DATES 3Kg
TINNED TOMATOES 24 DRIED FIGS 3Kg
TINNED MIXED VEGETABLES 18 DRIED PRUNES 3Kg
JARS JAM 12 JELLIES 12
JARS MARMALADE 6 SALTPETRE 100g
TINNED SYRUP 6 SALT PACKETS 12
TINNED SPAGHETTIE 18 SALT LOOSE 6Kg
TINNED CORNED BEEF 18 PICKLES 24 Mixed
TINNED SPAM 18 BAKING POWDER 4Kg
TINNED SAUSAGES 18 GOLDEN RAISING POWDER 3Kg
FLOUR 190Kg SUET 6Kg
H P SAUCE 12 LARD 16Kg
TOMATO SAUCE 12 BEEF 100Kg
DRIED PEAS 12Kg MUTTON 20Kg
DRIED SPLIT PEAS 12Kg PORK 20Kg
DRIED BEANS 12Kg CHICKENS 8
POTATOES 8 Bags SAUSAGES 5Kg
CABBAGES 14Kg LIVER 5Kg
CARROTS 14Kg PORK CHOPS 24
ONIONS 9Kg OX TAILS 4Kg
BEETROOT 5Kg BLACK PUDDING 5Kg
TURNIPS 5Kg BACON 30Kg
MARGARINE 16Kg HAM 1
BUTTER 5Kg EGGS 21 Dozen
RICE 5Kg SARDINES 16 Tins
TAPIOCA 4Kg CHEESE 5Kg
MACARONI 4Kg    
       

When we look at the list above it seems an adequate amount to feed the men aboard the trawler bearing in mind that fresh fish also complimented the diet and bread was baked on a daily basis by the cook.

Whilst the list above is a guide line on most vessels there where often shortages and nowhere near the prescribed items been placed aboard, was this also a cost saving measure implemented by the greed of trawler owners?, this was also the case for sundry items for such things as toilet rolls, cleaning materials ect.


" The big stew pot would be filled from day one as we sailed, and a lovely stew was made up dished out and probably half or three quarter emptied, without been cleaned out the pot would be topped up on a daily basis the scum and sedement going to the bottom, as the days progressed the stew got thicker, if you managed to get to the galley first you got a decent top but as the pot went down you dregged the bottom, another trick in them days was for the deck crew to hang the mittens to dry over the stove of which the drippings often ended up in the pot,". P G .

 

A typical days menu from the 60`s - Supplemented with - fish for breakfast and tea ( inplace of breakfast ? )

Breakfast 7o`Clock

Cereal , Bacon , Eggs, Tomatoes - Tea, Bread and Butter

Dinner 12 o`clock

Soup - Roast Beef - Gravy Yorkshire Puds - Boiled Potatoes - Carrots - Cabbage - Pudding - Custard

High Tea 6pm

Sausage - Beans - Gravy - Chips - Bread and Butter

Late Watch 10pm

Bread - Cheese - Spam - Sardines - Tea

 

STERN FISHERS.

Stern Fishers been away for 3 months at a time carried far more stores an initial problem was if you got a over zealous cook he could soon use the stores and vessel found they had to go in from the fishing grounds to restock , this problem was somewhat alleviated by owners when they started to place boxes aboard marked on a monthly basis, first months - second months and so on.