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WREN H215
Built
1897
Edwards Brothers North Shields
Off Number
108530
Length Ft
106.0 / 118.2
Tons Gross
144/ 166
Yard Number
553
Breadth Ft
20.6
Tons Net
44
Launched
16 06 1887
Draught
11.0
Hp
41 HP
Registered
21 07 1897
Engine Builder
N. E. Marine Engineering Co Ltd, Sunderland
Knots
K
Registered WREN FD174 Owners 21 07 1897 Kelsall Brothers & Beeching Ltd, Manchester - John E. A. Kelsall & George Beeching, Fleetwood, managers
  . Owners 24 03 1899 Transfered to Hull - Kelsall Bros & Beeching Hull
  WREN H215 Owners 12 04 1899 Registered at Hull - Kelsall Bros & Beeching Hull
  . Collision 23 07 1905 North Sea. Slight damage to our stern. Collision with the steam trawler Prome H88 of Hull through him trying to pass our stern.
  . . 11 02 1906 North Sea. Broke our rudder necessitating our being towed home by the Hull trawler Kite H773. Cause unknown
  . Lengthened 07 09 1912 119.0 ft 168g 64n.
  . . 17 09 1912 Re registered at Hull H215 after lengthening
  HMT WREN Owners Nov 1914 Admiralty Requisition
Renamed HMT WHITETHROAT Owners July 1918 Admiralty renamed
  WREN H215 Owners 1919 Returned from Admiralty name reverted - Kelsall Bros & Beeching Hull - John Slater, manager
  . . 10 03 1922 Hull Register closed
Fate : 18 Dec 1923 Sank North Sea
Admiralty Requisition
Pennant No
Role
Returned
Nov 1914
682
Minesweeper
1919
Dover Auxilliary Patrol 1-6pdr HA

WREN

As can been seen in the photo of Wren the open bridge has been moved forward of the funnel, in some of the earlier vessels the funnel was in front of the bridge causing bad visibility from the stack and the smoke.

THE TOLL OF THE SEA
HULL STEAM TRAWLER LOST WITH ALL HANDS
NINE VALUABLE LIVES PAY FORFEIT
A BLIND WIDOW LOSSES HER SON

It was the "Mails" sad duty on Friday night to announce a distressing catastrophe which, on the eve of Christmas, has overtaken the Hull fishing fleet. The steam trawler Wren, of the Gamecock Fleet, which is now run in conjunction with the Red Cross Fleet, has been lost with her entire personnel of nine hands. The ill-fated crew was comprised as listed below:.

ALL THAT WILL EVER BE KNOWN,

The wren was lost in a terrific gale on Tuesday. At that time the fleet were fishing on the south side of the Dogger Bank. about 180 miles E.N.E of Spurn a position which, having regard to the direction of the wind, north-west, should have provided them with the smoother water of any part of the North Sea.  About 5 o`clock in the afternoon a violent gale sprang up, and raged with terrible violence untill 1 o`clock on Wednesday morning, the various trawlers in the fleet making themselves as snug as possible to compete with the storm.

TRAGIC RADIO MESSAGE

Skipper Glanville of the trawler, Bempton, was the Admiral of the fleet, and it is from him the news of the disaster has been received. On wednesday he sent a wireless message to the owners at Hull, notifying them of the gale, and his fear tht one of the trawlers had been lost in it. On Friday the steam carrier Pigeon arrived at Hull, bringing with it a letter from Skipper Glanville, giving details, so far as they ever will be known, of how the Wren and the nine men in her were lost. In his radio message he had stated that one of the fleeters, name unknown, had been seen to sink, but her identity unknown.

IN THE DARK

His further particulars show that the calamity occured about 6 o`clock, one hour after the gale commenced. It was dark and the men on the various trawlers could not see the length of their own vessels. The lights, however, were visible. Suddenly, those of one trawler which was about a mile away from the Admiral`s ship, began to disappear. The first thought in the minds of those who witnessed what was occurring, and understood its full import, was to rush to the aid of their comrades, but before they could do so a blinding snow storm came on, blotting out everything. When the snow cleared, the Bempton and other vessels hastened to the spot where the vessel`s lights had last been seen, but no trace of her could be discovered. Ship and crew had been engulfed.

MATTER FOR CONJECTURE

What really happened is a matter of surmise, but it is practically certain that a sea of unusual size broke upon the Wren, smashing in her decks and sending her to the bottom, like a stone. Hull Steam trawlers are strudily built vessels, and will weather a gale as well as any ship afloat, but occasionally it occurs, as in the case of the Wren that a sea of abnormal size towering up above them, breakes and percipitates thousands of tons of water upon them. In that case their position is hopeless. The Wren was twenty-six years old, but such a fate has happened to new vessels. One instance is recorded of a Hull trawler being so lost on her voyage.

ANOTHER SHIP DISABLED

Some time elapsed before the fleet knew which trawler it was that had been lost, and it was only by a sort of roll-call being called that the Wren`s identity was established. During the gale a another member of the fleet, the trawler Raven, was disabled, a violent sea carrying away her rudder, by clever seamanship the crew preserved  their ship from further damage, and she is now been towed home by the trawler Grossbeak.  Mr Summers, the fisherman`s missionary, had the melancholy duty of visiting the bereaved homes on Friday night and breaking the sad news. Most, if not all the men, are married, but a full list of their dependants have not yet been compiled. Although the firm knew of the disaster they paid the crew`s wages as usual on Friday afternoon, and pending absolute confirmation, made no mention of the matter to the wives and others who came for money. The Bosun leaves six children and the cook a blind mother who became a widow less than a week ago. A Widows and Orphans Fund , to which both owners  and crews contribute, will pay each widow ten shillings a week and each child three shillings.

 

Surname
Christian
Age
Address / Vessel
Birth Pl
Occupation / Relationship
Date/ Scource
Detail
. . . . . . . .
INGMIRE A 20 WREN H215 . Fireman 03 May 1905 North Sea. A Ingmire, trimmer. Drowned; believed accidentally fell overboard.
. . . 40 Brighton Street . . . .
WHILDS ROBERT 48 WREN H215 . Deckhand 25 Oct 1921 Died aboard vessel
. . . 12 Cave Tce Wassand St . . . .
. . . . . . . .
FREDERICKSON CHRISTOPHER 39 WREN H215 . Bosun 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . Vine Place Alexandria St Hull . . . .
FREER G . WREN H215 . Ch Engineer 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . 12 Derwent Ave, Hampshire St . . . PHOTO IN NEWS - FREES
HODSON CHARLES . WREN H215 . Second Engineer 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . 6 Gloucester St Hull . . . Leaves a widow and three children - served on minesweepers during the war.
JOHNSON CHARLES . WREN H215 . Cook 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . 3 Sykes Street Hull . . . Mother was 63 years of age and blind and was widowed the week previously, her son was her only support
KARLSON
WILLIAM
.
WREN H215 . Bosun 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . 23 Market Place Barton . . . .
LIDDLE AUSTIN 43 WREN H215 . Deckhand 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . 30 Lincoln St Hull . . . .
MATTHEWS FREDERICK . WREN H215 . Fireman / Trimmer 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . Cavendish Square Margaret St Hull . . . .
MOBBS FRANCIS 39 WREN H215 . Skipper 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . 30 Lincoln St Hull . . . .
RUNTON JAMES 28 WREN H215 . Third Hand 18 Dec 1923 Vessel missing lost with all hands
. . . 23 Great Thornton St Hull . . . PHOTO IN PAPER -  ( F ROGERS ) BELIEVE THIS IS - J RUNTON
. . . . . . . .
HOWELL JOHN . WREN H215 . Skipper 26 Feb 1900 .
HODDER R . WREN H215 . Skipper 26 Feb 1900 .
NOWACK F . WREN H215 . Skipper 26 Feb 1900 .
POULSON P . WREN H215 . Second Hand 26 Feb 1900 .
HALL JAMES . WREN H215 Bosun 26 Feb 1900 .
SMITT J W . WREN H215 Third hand 26 Feb 1900 .
KENYON S . WREN H215 . Fourth hand 26 Feb 1900 .
. . . . . . . .
FEENEY THOMAS . HMT WREN . . . .
BLACKETT JOHN WILLIAM . HMT WHITETHROAT . Steward . .
. . . 41 Hillyard Street Grimsby . . . .
. . . . . . . .