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THOMAS HARDY H257
Built
1925
Cochranes Selby
Off Number
149040
Length Ft
140.3
Tons Gross
336
Yard Number
986
Breadth Ft
24.0
Tons Net
133
Launched
21 09 1925
Draught
13.1
Hp
96 HP
Registered
04 12 1925
Engine Builder
C D Holmes
Knots
11K
Registered THOMAS HARDY H257 Owners 04 12 1925 Newington Steam Trawling Co Ltd
    Owners 04 02 1937 Hull register closed total loss
Fate : 24 Nov 1936 Wrecked Norway on Bremneset Point in Vest Fjordn, near Tranoy Light House
 

THOMAS HARDY

Monday 28 Nov 1927 During thick fog the Hull Trawler Thomas Hardy Collided with the tank steamer Alchymist which then had to return to Hull for repairs

1929 The Thomas Hardy was falsely  reported as been lost which caused much anxiety to the families of the crewmen.

 

Surname
Christian
Age
Vessel
Birth Pl
Occupation
Date/ Scource
Detail
. . . . . . . .
LEYLAND THOMAS 50 THOMAS HARDY H257 . Fireman 15 Aug 1936 Lost overboard
. . . Goulton St Hull . . . .
. . . . . . . .
RANDALL ROBERT . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Skipper   Spent 5 years on the Thomas Hardy as skipper
HOSKIN JOHN . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Skipper 1929 Jan 1929 Ceritifacte suspended for 3 months
ARCHER HARRY . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Skipper 1930 .
CLEVELAND ERNEST . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Bosun 1930 .
. . . . . . . .
TAYLOR ALFRED GEORGE . THOMAS HARDY H257 . . 24 Nov 1936 Skipper when vessel stranded Board of Trade Enquiry into stranding and total loss of the Thomas Hardy at Brimness on Norwegian coast 24 Nov 1936 : Third hand on bridge repeatedly called skipper to come up as vessel running into danger. Skipper came up first time but went below and did not come up again. Should have. Gave orders to change course but orders were not safe or proper. Cause was negligent navigation. Cert suspended for 2 years with recommendation that mate's certificate granted after 12 months
. . . . . . . .
TAYLOR GEORGE ROBERT . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Third Hand 24 Nov 1936 Vessel stranding
WARREN . . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Sparehand 24 Nov 1936 Vessel stranding
ARNELL . . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Sparehand 24 Nov 1936 Vessel stranding
POWDRELL JAMES . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Second Engineer 24 Nov 1936 Vessel stranding
HUNTER ERNEST . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Deckhand Nov 1931 19th Nov 1931 assisted in rescue of crew of HOWE GY177 Grimsby vessel ( See IMPERIALIST H143 ) Received the Bronze Medal from the King for saving life at sea
CREIGHTON ALEX . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Sparehand Oct 1936 19th Nov 1931 assisted in rescue of crew of HOWE GY177 Grimsby vessel ( See IMPERIALIST H143 )
. . . . . . . .
WOODHALL FRED . THOMAS HARDY H257 . Fisherman Oct 1929 Charged at the Hull Police court for disobeying an order to join the trawler Thomas Hardy - Defendant pleaded guilty and admitted this was his fifth appearrance for similar offences in the past - Fined one Guinea and costs.
. . . . . . . .

 

STEAM TRAWLER "THOMAS HARDY."

THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ACT, 1894.

REPORT OF COURT

In the matter of a Formal Investigation held at the Guildhall, Hull, on the 2nd, 3rd and 5th days of February, 1937, before J. R. Macdonald, Esquire, O.B.E., Stipendiary Magistrate, assisted by Captain F. J. Thompson, O.B.E., R.D., R.N.R., Commander J. R. Williams, R.D., R.N.R., and Felix Bee, Esquire, into the circumstances attending the stranding and subsequent total loss of the British steam trawler "Thomas Hardy" of the Port of Hull, at Bremneset Point, Norway, on the 24th day of November, 1936.

The Court, having carefully inquired into the circumstances attending the above-mentioned shipping casualty, finds, for the reasons stated in the Annex hereto, that the stranding of the said vessel was caused by the wrongful act and default of the skipper, Alfred George Taylor.

The Court finds the skipper, Alfred George Taylor, in grave default and suspends his certificate of competency as skipper (number 19041) for two years from this date.

Dated this 5th day of February, 1937.

J. R. MACDONALD,

Judge.

We concur in the above Report.

FRED. J. THOMPSON,

J. R. WILLIAMS,

F. BEE, Assessors.

Annex to the Report.

This Inquiry was held at the Guildhall, Hull, on the 2nd, 3rd and 5th days of February, 1937. Mr. H. L. Saxelbye appeared for the Board of Trade, Mr. B. Pearlman represented the skipper, the third hand appeared in person and Dr. T. C. Jackson represented the underwriters, the Hull Steam Trawlers' Mutual Insurance and Protecting Company, Limited, who made themselves parties to the Inquiry.

The s.t. "Thomas Hardy", official number 149,040, was a steel built steam trawler, ketch-rigged, built by Messrs. Cochrane & Sons, Limited, Selby, in 1925. Her tonnage was 335.93 gross, 132.93 net register.

She was fitted with reciprocating triple expansion direct acting engines with vertical inverted cylinders of 96 N.H.P. (600 I.H.P.) and a cylindrical multitubular boiler of steel with a loaded pressure of 200 lbs. The engines and boiler were built by Messrs. C. D. Holmes & Co., Ltd., of Hull. The designed speed of the vessel was 11 knots.

Her registered dimensions were: length 140.3 feet, main breadth 24 feet and depth of hold 13.1 feet.

She was constructed with five bulkheads.

She was equipped with the boat and life-saving appliances usual in vessels of her class.

She was owned by the Newington Steam Trawling Company, Limited, of St. Andrew's Dock, Hull.

This vessel left Hull with a crew of 16 hands all told on the 3rd November, 1936, bound for the White Sea fishing grounds under the command of Albert George Taylor, skipper, certificate number 19041, dated 23rd June, 1930.

The vessel arrived at the fishing grounds on the 10th November, 1936, and remained there fishing until the 21st November, 1936, when she started on her return voyage, arriving at Lodingen at 2 p.m. on the 24th November, 1936, for bunkers.

On arrival the skipper called at the coal agents, whose office was on the quay, and remained there until about 3.30 p.m. when he returned to the ship and found that bunkering was completed and the vessel ready for proceeding on her voyage.

During the course of the Inquiry the skipper admitted that whilst ashore he had two drinks from a bottle of whisky with the agent and that he brought the remainder of the bottle back to the ship. The bottle was said to be about half full.

Immediately upon arrival on board shortly after 3.30 p.m. the skipper gave orders to unmoor and the vessel proceeded on her voyage.

The weather at the time was fine with intermittent snow flurries. Shortly after casting off from the quay Baroy Island Light was seen on the port bow distant about 4 miles. No bearing was taken but the vessel was headed and steamed towards the light, and when about ½ mile off, course was altered to S.W.½S. to bring Tranoy Light, which was then visible about 14 miles distant, right ahead. Speed was increased to full (about 9½ to 10 knots).

At this time the skipper being on the bridge told the third hand "Go straight for that light but don't hit it."

Two other hands, Warren and Arnell, were in the watch and took turns at the wheel until the casualty.

The skipper called the second engineer to the bridge to change over the steam steering to hand and then took him into the chart room where they each had a drink. The Court were unable to decide the particular drink that was consumed from time to time by the skipper but are certain it was some form of alcohol.

After a few minutes below the skipper again came on the bridge and, when nearing Tranoy Light, the skipper altered the course to S.W.½W. to pass the light on the port hand. At about 5.15 p.m. the light being abeam, distant about ¾ mile, the skipper altered the course to S.W. nothing southerly and sent the third hand to set the log.

The skipper then went below and had a drink in the chart room with the wireless operator.

The third hand, having been left by the skipper in charge of the bridge, was looking out through the open starboard window when he suddenly saw, as the snow cleared, the red sector of Buvaagen Light so close on the port bow that the tripod was visible to him. He at once told Arnell, who was at the wheel, to "pull her out" which he did. The third hand then saw rocks and called the skipper to come up as the ship was very close to the rocks.

The skipper came up and looked round, saw the light and said "Why! you're all right!" and ordered the vessel back on her course. He then asked the course, was told S.W. nothing southerly and said "All right! Go S.W. straight", and went below.

Very shortly the third hand saw more rocks ahead and a white light to starboard. This must have been Bremneset Light. He again ordered the man at the wheel to" pull her out" which he did to W. × S. and at the same time called to the skipper "Better come up, skipper. We are heading for these rocks". The skipper in the chart room, called back" You are all right" and did not come up, and ordered the third hand to put the vessel back on her course.

Immediately afterwards the third hand seeing more rocks ahead rang the engines to stop on his own responsibility, the skipper at once shouting up "What are you stopping for?". He replied "We are heading straight for the rocks" to which the skipper, still below, answered "You ring her on. I'll tell you when to stop the engines".

Accordingly the third hand rang on for full speed ahead and almost at once rang her full astern. Before the engines could check her way the vessel struck close to the Bremneset Light.

The skipper then at last came on deck and, until 9 p.m. or so, endeavours were made by the use of the engines to get the vessel off, but she was fast and badly holed. The engine room flooded and all attempts were abandoned.

The crew, all save the skipper, who refused to leave the vessel, left her about 9.30 p.m. by the vessel's own boat and were picked up by a motor boat that with others had come in answer to the "Thomas Hardy's" rockets. The skipper was taken off by a salvage boat at about 1.30 a.m. on the 25th November.

The opinion of the Court is that the vessel was lost as a result of the negligent navigation on the part of the skipper in setting an incorrect course after Tranoy, staying below when repeatedly warned of practically immediate danger and in ordering the third hand to go ahead in the face of such danger without first coming on deck and investigating it for himself.

The skipper's conduct, set out above, resulted from the fact that he had been drinking from the time he landed at Lodingen until the casualty occurred.

At the conclusion of the evidence adduced on behalf of the Board of Trade Mr. Saxelbye submitted Questions for the opinion of the Court.

Mr. Pearlman, on behalf of the skipper, called Mrs. Lavinia Taylor, the wife of the skipper, to give evidence as to a statement made by the second engineer, James Powdrell, with reference to the condition of the skipper at the time of the casualty.

Dr. Jackson, on behalf of the underwriters, Mr. Pearlman and the third hand having respectively addressed the Court, and Mr. Saxelbye having replied on behalf of the Board of Trade, the Court gave judgment and returned Answers to the Questions of the Board of Trade.

The Questions and Answers are as follows: —

Q. 1. When the s.t. "Thomas Hardy" left Hull on her final voyage, was she in good and seaworthy condition?

A. When the s.t. "Thomas Hardy" left Hull on her final voyage she was in good and seaworthy condition.

Q. 2. What Charts and Admiralty Pilots had she on board when she left Hull on her final voyage? Were such Charts and Admiralty Pilots properly corrected up to date?

A. She had on board a full complement of Charts and six volumes of the Admiralty Pilots when she left Hull on her final voyage. Such Charts and Admiralty Pilots were properly corrected up to date.

Q. 3. What compasses did the vessel carry and where were they situated? When and by whom had they last been professionally adjusted? Were deviation cards supplied to the skipper after such adjustments?

A. The vessel carried a pole compass forward of the bridge, a compass in the roof of the bridge and a compass in the chart room. They had last been professionally adjusted on the 15th August, 1936, by Mr. A. E. Cater, of the compass department of the Hull Steam Trawlers' Mutual Insurance and Protecting Co., Ltd., of St. Andrew's Dock, Hull. Deviation cards were supplied to the skipper then commanding after such adjustments.

Q. 4. Were the compasses sufficient for the safe navigation of the vessel? Had the skipper corrected the compasses by observation from time to time and did he know the proper corrections to apply to the compasses?

A. The compasses were sufficient for the safe navigation of the vessel. The skipper had not corrected the compasses by observation from time to time and did not know the proper corrections to apply to the compasses, but found the pole compass correct magnetic after ten days navigating on dead reckoning.

Q. 5. What sounding appliances were on board the vessel?

A. A fathometer and hand leads and lines were on board the vessel.

Q. 6. When did the vessel leave Lodingen on the 24th November, 1936?

A. The vessel left Lodingen at about 3.30 p.m. on the 24th November, 1936.

Q. 7. When the vessel left Lodingen was her wireless transmitter in good order and condition?

A. When the vessel left Lodingen her wireless transmitter was not in good order and condition.

Q. 8. What was the distance and bearing of Baroy Island Lighthouse when it was first seen?

A. The distance of Baroy Island Lighthouse when it was first seen was about four miles on the port bow but no bearing was taken.

Q. 9. At what distance was the vessel from Baroy Island Light when it was abeam? Was this distance ascertained by taking proper and adequate bearings or was it merely estimated?

A. The vessel was about ½ mile from Baroy Island Light when it was abeam. This distance was merely estimated.

Q. 10. On what course was the vessel when Baroy Island Light was abeam? Was that course a safe and proper one?

A. When Baroy Island Light was abeam the vessel was steadied on a course S.W.½S. This course was a safe and proper one.

Q. 11. Was any, and if so what, alteration made in the course of the vessel after Baroy Island Light was abeam?

A. The course of the vessel was altered after Baroy Island was abeam to S.W.½W.

Q. 12. If an alteration was made, by whom was it made? Was the altered course safe and proper?

A. The alteration was made by the skipper. The altered course was not safe and proper.

Q. 13. Who was in charge of the navigation of the vessel on her voyage when Baroy Light was abeam?

A. The skipper was in charge of the navigation of the vessel on her voyage when Baroy Light was abeam.

Q. 14. What were the conditions of (a) the weather, (b) the visibility, when Baroy Light was abeam?

A. When Baroy Light was abeam (a) the weather was fine with light snow, (b) the visibility was good.

Q. 15. Was there any, and if so what, change in those conditions before the vessel stranded?

A. There was little change in those conditions before the vessel stranded.

Q. 16. At what speed was the vessel proceeding when Baroy Light was abeam? Were any, and if so what, alterations in her speed made before the vessel stranded?

A. The vessel was proceeding at 9½ to 10 knots when Baroy Light was abeam. The engines were stopped once for a few moments and were put full speed astern just before the vessel struck.

Q. 17. Did the skipper go below after passing Baroy Light? If so, whom did he leave in charge of the navigation of the vessel?

A. The skipper did go below after passing Baroy Light. He left the third hand, George Robert Taylor, in charge of the bridge.

Q. 18. Did the person in charge of the navigation of the vessel give any, and if so what, warnings to the skipper indicating that the vessel was running into danger?

A. The third hand gave the skipper repeated urgent calls to come on to the bridge as the vessel was running into danger and that the vessel was close to rocks.

Q. 19. Did the skipper come on to the bridge on receiving those warnings? If not, should he have done so?

A. The skipper came on to the bridge on receiving the first warning only, but went below and did not come up again. He should have come up.

Q. 20. Did the skipper give any, and if so what, orders when he received those warnings? Were such orders right and proper?

A. On receiving the first warning the skipper countermanded the third hand's order to change course and set the vessel back on her course. Such orders were not right and proper.

Q. 21. Was a good lookout kept on board the vessel?

A. A good lookout was kept on board the vessel.

Q. 22. Was the vessel navigated with proper and seamanlike care?

A. The vessel was not navigated with proper and seamanlike care.

Q. 23. When and where did the vessel strand?

A. The vessel stranded at 5.40 p.m. on the 24th November, 1936, at Bremneset Point in Vest Fjordn, Lat. 68° 8½' N. Long. 15° 25' E.

Q. 24. What was the cause of the stranding of the vessel?

A. The cause of the stranding of the vessel was negligent navigation.

Q. 25. Were the stranding and subsequent total loss of the s.t. "Thomas Hardy" caused or contributed to by the wrongful act or default of Alfred George Taylor, her skipper, and George Robert Taylor, her third hand; or either, and if so, which of them?

A. The stranding and subsequent total loss of the s.t. "Thomas Hardy" was caused by the wrongful act and default of Alfred George Taylor, her skipper.

J. R. MACDONALD,

Judge