KINGSTON PERIDOT H55
Built
1929
Cook Welton & Gemmell
Off Number
160840
Length Ft
140.5
Tons Gross
352
Yard Number
522
Breadth Ft
24.0
Tons Net
137 / 151.9
1937 Lengthened
151.5
Tons
356 / 151.9
Launched
08 June 1929
Engine Builder
C D Holmes
Hp
96 HP
Registered
11 July 1929
Knots
11.1 K
Registered KINGSTON PERIDOT H55 Owners 1929 - 1945 Kingston Steam Trawling Co Ltd Hull
    Lengthened 1937 Smiths Dock - 151.5 ft - 356 GT
  H.M.T KINGSTON PERIDOT Owners 1939 - 1945 Admiralty
Renamed KINGSTON PERIDOT GY89 Owners 09 Aug 1945 Trawlers Grimsby Ltd
  STOCKHAM GY89 Owners 1946 Trawlers Grimsby Ltd
  WYRE MONITOR FD 304 Owners 1948 Wyre Steam Trawlers Fleetwood
Fate : 1954 Scrapped
Admiralty Requisition
Pennant No
Role
Returned
1939
FY4.69
ABV - A/S
1945
 

 

 

IN REMEMBERANCE OF CREWMEN WHO DIED AT SEA
Surname
Christian
Age
Vessel
Birth
Occupation
Date of Death
Detail
. . . . . . . .
HUTCHINSON WALTER 21 KINGSTON PERIDOT H55 . SPARE HAND 11 JAN 1930 DIED IN HULL ROYAL AFTER ACCIDENT
. . . . . . . .

 

Surname
Christian
Age
Vessel
Birth Pl
Occupation
Date/ Scource
Detail
CREWMEN
HOGG CHARLES . KINGSTON PERIDOT H5 . Skipper Dec 1929 .
RILATT J R . KINGSTON PERIDOT H5 . Bosun Dec 1929 .
JACKSON F W . KINGSTON PERIDOT H5 . Sparehand Dec 1929 .
BALL ALBERT EDWARD . KINGSTON PERIDOT H55 . Skipper 1934 .
POWDRELL CHARLES THOMAS . KINGSTON PERIDOT H55 . Bosun / Third hand 1934 .
COWLAM ? . KINGSTON PERIDOT H5 . Deckhand 1934 .
GAUTIER A C . KINGSTON PERIDOT H55 . Cook c 1939 .

 

Fact File

The Court, having carefully inquired into the circumstances attending the above-mentioned shipping casualty, the stranding of the British steam trawler "Kingston Peridot", of the Port of Hull, on the 24th day of February, 1934, finds, for the reasons stated ,that the stranding of the said vessel was due to the wrongful act of the skipper, Albert Edward Ball, and was contributed to by the default of the third hand, Charles Thomas Powdrell.

The Court finds the skipper, Albert Edward Ball, in grave default and suspends his certificate for nine months from this date, and the Court orders that the third hand, Charles Thomas Powdrell, do pay the sum of five pounds towards the costs of the Inquiry.

The vessel left Hull on the 9th February, 1934, for a fishing voyage in Icelandic waters. On arriving on the east coast of Iceland the vessel fished at various points, proceeding west towards North Cape and Brede Bugt. Weather conditions and floating ice then decided the skipper to make down the west side of the island and he arrived off Svortuloft Light on that coast at about 8.45 p.m. on the 23rd February, when he made his position 3½ to 4 miles W.N.W. of the light. The weather was moderate, clear, intermittent snow showers, wind N. to N.E. and sea moderate, and the skipper had no difficulty in picking up the light.

He streamed the log and set a course S. ¼ W. which would take him 3½ miles off Reykjanes Light on the south east corner of Iceland, a run of 75 miles.

The skipper went below telling the second hand then in charge of the vessel to call him when the log showed 50 miles, or if the weather changed, or there was any unforeseen occurrence. The course and speed of 10 knots were maintained until 10 p.m. when Malarif Light was sighted bearing E. at an estimated distance of about 4 miles. A sounding with the fathometer gave 55 fathoms. The skipper, who until now had been up and down from his chartroom, now turned in. He was called by the second hand at 1.45 a.m. on the 24th February as the log showed 50 miles.

At 1.50 a.m. the skipper returned to the bridge and at 2.20 a.m. took a bearing of Skagi Light S.E. by E. at an estimated distance of between 10 and 12 miles. The fathometer gave 47 fathoms. The skipper had expected to be at least 13 miles off Skagi Light and, finding he had been set in, altered the vessel's course to S. by W. He checked his position on the chart and then came back on the bridge where he remained until 3.15 a.m.

At 3.5 a.m. the third hand, Charles Thomas Powdrell, took the wheel, his mate, Cowlam, a deck hand, coming on watch and relieving him at the wheel a few minutes later.

At 3.10 a.m. Stafnes Light bore S.E. by E., and Reykjanes bore S. A cross bearing of these two lights was taken by the skipper who made the position on the chart four miles off Stafnes Light. The skipper was not satisfied and altered course to S. by W. ½ W. and at 3.15 a.m. went below to see if, by using his wireless receiving set, he could pick up any information from trawlers in the neighbourhood, as to weather and fishing conditions.

Before leaving the bridge the skipper told Powdrell to let him know when the "flash light" (Stafnes Light) was abeam, and to take a sounding.

At 3.20 a.m. Powdrell reported the said light abeam and a sounding of 42 fathoms.

The skipper, satisfied that he was 4 miles off Stafnes Light, and that the course S. by W. ½ W. would take him three miles off Reykjanes, remained below until 3.40 a.m., when, as he was returning to the bridge, the vessel struck.

From the time Cowlam took the wheel Powdrell had been on the lookout, but it appeared from the evidence that he carried out this duty in the most inefficient fashion, as, although he was stationed at the forward starboard (open) window, he neither saw the land, nor saw nor heard breakers. In fact, when the vessel struck, he opened the after door of the wheelhouse to see if the bump was caused by a sea coming aboard. The Court is forced to the conclusion that Powdrell was asleep at the time.

As the vessel struck, the skipper rang the engines "full astern" but it was not possible to get her off.

She went ashore on a ledge with sand on the starboard and rocks on the port side; there being 3 fathoms of water aft and 1 fathom abeam the galley.

Rockets were sent up and the s.t. "St. Amandus" came to assist, but it being dangerous to attempt to help to seaward, she informed the shore. Assistance came from Reykjavik and the crew were landed by rocket apparatus, but the vessel being in no danger, they returned. Coal was jettisoned to put the vessel on a starboard list and she was got off on the 27th February, and, after temporary repairs at Reykjavik, was able to make Hull under her own steam on the 3rd March.